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SEC Filings

10-K
AMAZON COM INC filed this Form 10-K on 01/30/2013
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operations during all three periods. We expect this trend to continue over time. The purchase of property in 2012 included the acquisition of 11 buildings comprising 1.8 million square feet of our previously leased corporate office space and three city blocks in Seattle, Washington for $1.4 billion. Capital expenditures included $381 million, $256 million, and $176 million for internal-use software and website development during 2012, 2011, and 2010. Stock-based compensation capitalized for internal-use software and website development costs does not affect cash flows. In 2012, 2011, and 2010, we made cash payments, net of acquired cash, related to acquisition and other investment activity of $745 million, $705 million, and $352 million.

Cash provided by (used in) financing activities was $2.3 billion, $(482) million, and $181 million in 2012, 2011, and 2010. Cash outflows from financing activities result from repurchases of common stock, payments on obligations related to capital leases and leases accounted for as financing arrangements, and repayments of long-term debt. Payments on obligations related to capital leases and leases accounted for as financing arrangements and repayments of long-term debt, were $588 million, $444 million, and $221 million in 2012, 2011, and 2010. We repurchased 5.3 million shares of common stock for $960 million in 2012 and 1.5 million shares of common stock for $277 million in 2011 under the $2.0 billion repurchase program authorized by our Board of Directors in January 2010. Cash inflows from financing activities primarily result from proceeds from long-term debt and tax benefits relating to excess stock-based compensation deductions. Proceeds from long-term debt and other were $3.4 billion, $177 million, and $143 million in 2012, 2011, and 2010. During 2012, cash inflows from financing activities consisted primarily of net proceeds from the issuance of $3.0 billion of senior nonconvertible unsecured debt in three tranches: $750 million of 0.65% notes due in 2015; $1.0 billion of 1.20% notes due in 2017; and $1.3 billion of 2.50% notes due in 2022. See Item 8 of Part II, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data—Note 6—Long-Term Debt” for additional discussion of the notes. Tax benefits relating to excess stock-based compensation deductions are presented as financing cash flows. Cash inflows from tax benefits related to stock-based compensation deductions were $429 million, $62 million, and $259 million in 2012, 2011, and 2010.

In 2012, 2011, and 2010 we recorded net tax provisions of $428 million, $291 million, and $352 million. A majority of this provision is non-cash. We have tax benefits relating to excess stock-based compensation deductions that are being utilized to reduce our U.S. taxable income. Except as required under U.S. tax law, we do not provide for U.S. taxes on our undistributed earnings of foreign subsidiaries that have not been previously taxed since we intend to invest such undistributed earnings indefinitely outside of the U.S. If our intent changes or if these funds are needed for our U.S. operations, we would be required to accrue or pay U.S. taxes on some or all of these undistributed earnings. At December 31, 2012, cash held by foreign subsidiaries was $4.3 billion, which include undistributed earnings of foreign subsidiaries indefinitely invested outside of the U.S. of $2.1 billion. Cash taxes paid (net of refunds) were $112 million, $33 million, and $75 million for 2012, 2011, and 2010. As of December 31, 2012, our federal net operating loss carryforward was approximately $89 million. We also have approximately $136 million of federal tax credits potentially available to offset future tax liabilities. As we utilize our federal tax credits, we expect cash paid for taxes to significantly increase. We endeavor to optimize our global taxes on a cash basis, rather than on a financial reporting basis.

See Item 8 of Part II, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data—Note 8—Commitments and Contingencies” for additional discussion of our principal contractual commitments, as well as our pledged securities. Purchase obligations and open purchase orders, consisting of inventory and significant non-inventory commitments, were $3.8 billion at December 31, 2012. Purchase obligations and open purchase orders are generally cancelable in full or in part through the contractual provisions.

On average, our high inventory velocity means we generally collect from consumers before our payments to suppliers come due. Inventory turnover was 9, 10, and 11 for 2012, 2011, and 2010. We expect variability in inventory turnover over time as it is affected by several factors, including our product mix, the mix of sales by us and by other sellers, our continuing focus on in-stock inventory availability and selection of product offerings, our investment in new geographies and product lines, and the extent to which we choose to utilize outsource fulfillment providers.

 

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