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SEC Filings

10-K
AMAZON COM INC filed this Form 10-K on 01/30/2013
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the processor core in our Kindle e-reader infringes two patents owned by Nazomi purporting to cover “Java virtual machine hardware for RISC and CISC processors” and “Java hardware accelerator using microcode engine” (U.S. Patent Nos. 7,080,362 and 7,225,436) and seeks monetary damages, injunctive relief, costs and attorneys’ fees. In October 2010, the case was transferred to the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. In January 2012, Nazomi added Amazon to a second lawsuit, which alleges, among other things, that the Kindle Fire infringes a patent owned by Nazomi purporting to cover a “Constant Pool Reference Resolution Method” (U.S. Patent No. 6,338,160) also seeking monetary damages, injunctive relief, costs and attorneys’ fees. We dispute the allegations of wrongdoing and intend to vigorously defend ourselves in this matter.

In July 2010, Positive Technologies Inc. filed a complaint against us for patent infringement in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. The complaint alleges, among other things, that certain of our products, including our Kindle e-reader, infringe three patents owned by the plaintiff purporting to cover a “DC Integrating Display Driver Employing Pixel Status Memories” (U.S. Patent Nos. 5,444,457; 5,627,558 and 5,831,588) and seeks monetary damages, injunctive relief, costs and attorneys’ fees. In April 2011, the case was transferred to the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. We dispute the allegations of wrongdoing and intend to vigorously defend ourselves in this matter.

In July 2010, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) staff informed us that it was considering whether to recommend enforcement proceedings against us for advertising and selling certain textile fiber products as “bamboo” when they are made of rayon manufactured from bamboo, in violation of the Textile Fiber Product Identification Act, the FTC Act, and the regulations promulgated thereunder. We do not believe we violated these laws and regulations and cooperated voluntarily with the Commission’s inquiry. In September 2011, we learned that the Commission voted to refer the matter to the Department of Justice for enforcement proceedings. In January 2013, we entered into a settlement of the inquiry that included, among other things, payment of a civil penalty. The payment was not material to either the current or future years.

In September 2010, Olympic Developments AG, LLC filed a complaint against us for patent infringement in the United States District Court for the Central District of California. The complaint alleges, among other things, that certain aspects of our technology, including our Kindle e-reader, infringe two patents owned by the plaintiff purporting to cover a “Transactional Processing System” (U.S. Patent No. 5,475,585) and a “Device for Controlling Remote Interactive Receiver” (U.S. Patent No. 6,246,400B1) and seeks monetary damages, injunctive relief, costs and attorneys’ fees. In February 2011, the case was transferred to the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington. In September 2011, the Court entered an order staying the lawsuit pending the outcome of the Patent and Trademark Office’s re-examination of the patents in suit. We dispute the allegations of wrongdoing and intend to vigorously defend ourselves in this matter.

In November 2010, Kelora Systems, LLC filed a complaint against us for patent infringement in the United States District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin. The complaint alleged that our website infringes a patent owned by Kelora Systems purporting to cover a “Method and system for executing a guided parametric search” (U.S. Patent No. 6,275,821) and sought monetary damages, costs, attorneys’ fees, and injunctive relief. In March 2011, the case was transferred to the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. In August 2011, Kelora filed an amended complaint adding Amazon subsidiaries Audible and Zappos as defendants. In May 2012, the lawsuit was dismissed on summary judgment. In June 2012, Kelora appealed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. We dispute the allegations of wrongdoing and intend to vigorously defend ourselves in this matter.

In December 2010, Technology Innovations, LLC filed a complaint against us for patent infringement in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas. The complaint alleges, among other things, that Amazon’s sale of e-books and Kindle e-readers infringes a patent owned by the plaintiff purporting to cover a “Device For Including Enhancing Information With Printed Information And Method For Electronic Searching Thereof” (U.S. Patent No. 5,517,407) and seeks monetary damages, injunctive relief, costs, interest, and

 

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