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SEC Filings

10-K
KEY ENERGY SERVICES INC filed this Form 10-K on 02/28/2018
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Valuation of Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets
We periodically review our intangible assets not subject to amortization, including our goodwill, to determine whether an impairment of those assets may exist. These tests must be made on at least an annual basis, or more often if circumstances indicate that the assets may be impaired. These circumstances include, but are not limited to, significant adverse changes in the business climate. The test for impairment of indefinite-lived intangible assets allows us to first assess the qualitative factors to determine whether it is “more likely than not” that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. If our qualitative analysis shows that it is “more likely than not” that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, we will perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. In the first step, a fair value is calculated for each of our reporting units, and that fair value is compared to the current carrying value of the reporting unit, including the reporting unit’s goodwill. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds its carrying value, there is no potential impairment, and the second step is not performed. If the carrying value exceeds the fair value of the reporting unit, then the second step is required. The second step of the test for impairment compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill to its current carrying value. The implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill is determined in the same manner as the amount of goodwill that would be recognized in a business combination, with the purchase price being equal to the fair value of the reporting unit. If the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill is in excess of its carrying value, no impairment charge is recorded. If the carrying value of the reporting unit’s goodwill is in excess of its implied fair value, an impairment charge equal to the excess is recorded. In determining the fair value of our reporting units, we use a weighted-average approach of three commonly used valuation techniques — a discounted cash flow method, a guideline companies method, and a similar transactions method. We assigned a weight to the results of each of these methods based on the facts and circumstances that are in existence for that testing period. We assigned more weight to the discounted cash flow method as we believe it is more representative of the future of the business. In addition to the estimates made by management regarding the weighting of the various valuation techniques, the creation of the techniques themselves requires that we make significant estimates and assumptions. The discounted cash flow method, which was assigned the highest weight by management during the current year, requires us to make assumptions about future cash flows, future growth rates, tax rates in future periods, book-tax differences in the carrying value of our assets in future periods, and discount rates. The assumptions about future cash flows and growth rates are based on our current budgets for future periods, as well as our strategic plans, the beliefs of management about future activity levels, and analysts’ expectations about our revenues, profitability and cash flows in future periods. The assumptions about our future tax rates and book-tax differences in the carrying value of our assets in future periods are based on the assumptions about our future cash flows and growth rates, and management’s knowledge of and beliefs about tax law and practice in current and future periods. The assumptions about discount rates include an assessment of the specific risk associated with each reporting unit being tested, and were developed with the assistance of a third-party valuation consultant. The ultimate conclusions of the valuation techniques remain our responsibility.
Valuation of Tangible and Finite-Lived Intangible Assets
Our fixed assets and finite-lived intangibles are tested for potential impairment when circumstances or events indicate a possible impairment may exist. These circumstances or events are referred to as “trigger events” and examples of such trigger events include, but are not limited to, an adverse change in market conditions, a significant decrease in benefits being derived from an acquired business, a change in the use of an asset, or a significant disposal of a particular asset or asset class.
If a trigger event occurs, an impairment test is performed based on an undiscounted cash flow analysis. To perform an impairment test, we make judgments, estimates and assumptions regarding long-term forecasts of revenues and expenses relating to the assets subject to review. Market conditions, energy prices, estimated depreciable lives of the assets, discount rate assumptions and legal factors impact our operations and have a significant effect on the estimates we use to determine whether our assets are impaired. If the results of the undiscounted cash flow analysis indicate that the carrying value of the assets being tested for impairment are not recoverable, then we record an impairment charge to write the carrying value of the assets down to their fair value. Using different judgments, assumptions or estimates, we could potentially arrive at a materially different fair value for the assets being tested for impairment, which may result in an impairment charge.
Valuation of Equity-Based Compensation
We issue or have issued time-based vesting and performance-based vesting stock options, time-based vesting and performance-based vesting restricted stock units, and restricted stock awards to our employees and non-employee directors. The options we grant are fair valued using a Black-Scholes option model on the grant date and are amortized to compensation expense over the vesting period of the option, net of forfeitures. Compensation related to restricted stock units and restricted stock awards is based on the fair value of the award on the grant date and is amortized to compensation expense over the vesting period of the award, net of forfeitures. The grant-date fair value of our time-based restricted stock units and restricted stock awards is determined using our stock price on the grant date. The grant-date fair value of our performance-based restricted stock units is determined using our stock price on the grant date assuming a 1.0x payout target, however, a maximum 2.0x payout could be achieved if certain EBITDA-based performance measures are met.

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