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10-K
ICONIX BRAND GROUP, INC. filed this Form 10-K on 03/28/2019
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design or manufacture products bearing our marks, and therefore, have more limited control over such products’ quality and design than a traditional product manufacturer might have.

Our success is largely dependent on the continued service of our key personnel.

As previously disclosed, we have experienced significant turnover in our senior management team. While we are not aware of any further pending changes in key management positions, we cannot provide assurance that we will effectively manage our current management transition or other future management changes we may experience. An inability to effectively manage these changes may impact our ability to retain our senior executives and other key employees, which could harm our operations.  Additional turnover at the senior management level may create instability within the Company and our employees may terminate their employment, which could further impede our ability to maintain day to day operations. Such instability could also impede our ability to fully implement our business plan and growth strategy, which would harm our business and prospects.

Changes in effective tax rates or adverse outcomes resulting from examination of our income or other tax returns could adversely affect our results.

Our future effective tax rates could be adversely affected by changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities, or by changes in tax laws or policies, or interpretations thereof. In addition, our current global tax structure could be negatively impacted by various factors, including changes in the tax rates in jurisdictions in which we earn income or changes in, or in the interpretation of, tax rules and regulations in jurisdictions in which we operate. An increase in our effective tax rate could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial position.

We also are subject to the continuous examination of our income tax returns by the Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities both domestically (including state and local entities) and abroad. We regularly assess the likelihood of recovering the amount of deferred tax assets recorded on the balance sheet and the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from examinations by various taxing authorities in order to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes. We cannot guarantee that the outcomes of these evaluations and continuous examinations will not harm our reported operating results and financial conditions.

We are subject to additional risks associated with our international licensees and joint ventures.

We market and license our brands outside the United States and many of our licensees are located, and joint ventures operate, outside the United States. As a key component of our business strategy, we intend to expand our international sales, including, without limitation, through joint ventures. We and our joint ventures face numerous risks in doing business outside the United States, including: (i) unusual or burdensome foreign laws or regulatory requirements or unexpected changes to those laws or requirements; (ii) tariffs, trade protection measures, import or export licensing requirements, trade embargoes, sanctions and other trade barriers (including, for example, given the recent uncertainty around tariffs in respect of trade between the US and China); (iii) competition from foreign companies; (iv) longer accounts receivable collection cycles and difficulties in collecting accounts receivable; (v) less effective and less predictable protection and enforcement of our IP; (vi) changes in the political or economic condition of a specific country or region (including, without limitation, as a result of political unrest), particularly in emerging markets; (vii) fluctuations in the value of foreign currency versus the U.S. dollar and the cost of currency exchange; (viii) potentially adverse tax consequences; and (ix) cultural differences in the conduct of business. Any one or more of such factors could cause our future international sales, or distributions from our international joint ventures, to decline or could cause us to fail to execute on our business strategy involving international expansion. In addition, our business practices in international markets are subject to the requirements of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and all other applicable anti-bribery laws, any violation of which could subject us to significant fines, criminal sanctions and other penalties.

A portion of our revenue and net income are generated outside of the United States, by certain of our licensees and our joint ventures, in countries that may have volatile currencies, capital control regimes, legal prohibitions on enforcing payment terms in license agreements or other risks.

A portion of our revenue is attributable to activities in territories and countries outside of the United States by certain of our joint ventures and our licensees. The fact that some of our revenue and certain business operations of our joint ventures and certain licensees are conducted outside of the United States exposes them to several additional risks, including, but not limited to social, political, regulatory and economic conditions or to laws and policies governing foreign trade and investment in the territories and countries where our joint ventures or certain licensees currently have operations or will in the future operate. Certain foreign jurisdictions also create difficulties collecting bad debts or other outstanding receivables owed to the Company or its joint ventures.  Any of these factors could have a negative impact on the business and operations of our joint ventures and certain of our licensees operations, which could also adversely impact our results of operations. Increase of revenue generated in foreign markets may also increase our exposure to risks related to foreign currencies, such as fluctuations in currency exchange rates and exposure to capital

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