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Sensata Technologies Holding N.V.'s SEC Filings

S-1/A
SENSATA TECHNOLOGIES HOLDING PLC filed this Form S-1/A on 03/09/2010
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Table of Contents

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure

 

We are a Netherlands public limited liability company and it may be difficult for you to obtain or enforce judgments against us in the United States.

 

We are incorporated under the laws of the Netherlands, and a substantial portion of our assets are located outside of the United States. As a result, although we have appointed an agent for service of process in the U.S., it may be difficult or impossible for United States investors to effect service of process within the United States upon us or to realize in the United States on any judgment against us including for civil liabilities under the United States securities laws. Therefore, any judgment obtained in any United States federal or state court against us may have to be enforced in the courts of the Netherlands, or such other foreign jurisdiction, as applicable. Because there is no treaty or other applicable convention between the United States and the Netherlands with respect to legal judgments, a judgment rendered by any United States federal or state court will not be enforced by the courts of the Netherlands unless the underlying claim is relitigated before a Dutch court. Under current practice, however, a Dutch court will generally grant the same judgment without a review of the merits of the underlying claim (i) if that judgment resulted from legal proceedings compatible with Dutch notions of due process, (ii) if that judgment does not contravene public policy of the Netherlands and (iii) if the jurisdiction of the United States federal or state court has been based on internationally accepted principles of private international law. To date, we are aware of only one case in which a Dutch court has considered whether such a foreign judgment would be enforced in the Netherlands. In that case, a U.S. court entered a default judgment against the defendant, a Netherlands resident, in a lawsuit involving a breach of contract claim. The defendant sought to relitigate the claim in the Netherlands. The Dutch lower court ruled that the criteria discussed above were satisfied with respect to the U.S. judgment, as a result of which the Dutch court granted the same judgment without a review of the merits of the underlying claim. Investors should not assume, however, that the courts of the Netherlands, or such other foreign jurisdiction, would enforce judgments of United States courts obtained against us predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the United States securities laws or that such courts would enforce, in original actions, liabilities against us predicated solely upon such laws.

 

Your rights and responsibilities as a shareholder will be governed by Dutch law and will differ in some respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders under U.S. law, and your shareholder rights under Dutch law may not be as clearly established as shareholder rights are established under the laws of some U.S. jurisdictions.

 

Our corporate affairs are governed by our articles of association and by the laws governing companies incorporated in the Netherlands. The rights of our shareholders and the responsibilities of members of our board of directors under Dutch law may not be as clearly established as under the laws of some U.S. jurisdictions. In the performance of its duties, our board of directors is required by Dutch law to consider the interests of our company, its shareholders, its employees and other stakeholders in all cases with reasonableness and fairness. It is possible that some of these parties will have interests that are different from, or in addition to, your interests as a shareholder. It is anticipated that all of our shareholder meetings will take place in the Netherlands.

 

In addition, the rights of holders of ordinary shares and many of the rights of shareholders as they relate to, for example, the exercise of shareholder rights, are governed by Dutch law and our articles of association and differ from the rights of shareholders under U.S. law. For example, Dutch law does not grant appraisal rights to a company’s shareholders who wish to challenge the consideration to be paid upon a merger or consolidation of the company. See “Description of Ordinary Shares” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

The provisions of Dutch corporate law and our articles of association have the effect of concentrating control over certain corporate decisions and transactions in the hands of our board of directors. As a result, holders of our shares may have more difficulty in protecting their interests in the face of actions by members of our board of directors than if we were incorporated in the United States. See “Description of Ordinary Shares” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

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