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Sensata Technologies Holding N.V.'s SEC Filings

S-1/A
SENSATA TECHNOLOGIES HOLDING PLC filed this Form S-1/A on 03/09/2010
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rate in effect on the date of the sale or exchange or, if the ordinary shares sold or exchanged are traded on an established securities market and the U.S. Holder is a cash basis taxpayer or an electing accrual basis taxpayer, the spot exchange rate in effect on the settlement date) and the U.S. Holder’s adjusted tax basis in the ordinary shares determined in U.S. dollars. The initial tax basis of the ordinary shares to a U.S. Holder will be the U.S. Holder’s U.S. dollar purchase price for the shares (determined by reference to the spot exchange rate in effect on the date of the purchase, or if the shares purchased are traded on an established securities market and the U.S. Holder is a cash basis taxpayer or an electing accrual basis taxpayer, the spot exchange rate in effect on the settlement date).

 

Assuming we are not a PFIC and have not been treated as a PFIC during your holding period for our ordinary shares, such gain or loss will be capital gain or loss and will be long-term gain or loss if the ordinary shares have been held for more than one year. With respect to sales occurring in taxable years commencing before January 1, 2011, the maximum long-term capital gain tax rate for an individual U.S. Holder is 15%. For sales beginning in taxable years after December 31, 2010, under current law the long-term capital gain rate for an individual U.S. Holder is 20%. The deductibility of capital losses is subject to limitations. Capital gain or loss, if any, recognized by a U.S. Holder generally will be treated as U.S. source income or loss for U.S. foreign tax credit purposes.

 

A non-U.S. Holder of ordinary shares will not be subject to United States income or withholding tax on gain from the sale or other disposition of ordinary shares unless (i) such gain is effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States or (ii) the non-U.S. Holder is an individual who is present in the United States for at least 183 days during the taxable year of the disposition and certain other conditions are met.

 

Potential Application of Passive Foreign Investment Company Provisions

 

We do not currently expect to be treated as a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes with respect to our taxable year ending December 31, 2010. This expectation is based in part on our estimates of the fair market value of our assets as determined based on the price of the ordinary shares in this offering and the expected price of the ordinary shares following the offering. Our actual PFIC status for the current taxable year will not be determinable until the close of such year, and, accordingly, there is no guarantee that we will not be a PFIC for the current taxable year. A non-U.S. corporation is considered to be a PFIC for any taxable year if either:

 

   

at least 75% of its gross income is passive income (the “income test”), or

 

   

at least 50% of the value of its assets (based on an average of the quarterly values of the assets during a taxable year) is attributable to assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income (the “asset test”).

 

We will be treated as owning our proportionate share of the assets and earning our proportionate share of the income of any other corporation in which we own, directly or indirectly, more than 25% (by value) of the stock. Subject to various exceptions, passive income generally includes dividends, interest, rents, royalties and gains from the disposition of assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income.

 

We must make a separate determination each year as to whether we are a PFIC. As a result, our PFIC status may change. In addition, the composition of our income and assets will be affected by how, and how quickly, we spend the cash raised in this offering. If we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which you hold ordinary shares, we generally will continue to be treated as a PFIC for all succeeding years during which you hold the ordinary shares. However, if we cease to be a PFIC, you may avoid some of the adverse effects of the PFIC regime by making a “deemed sale” election with respect to the ordinary shares, as applicable.

 

If we are or become a PFIC in a taxable year in which we pay a dividend or the prior taxable year, the 15% dividend rate discussed above with respect to dividends paid to non-corporate holders would not apply. In addition, if we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which you hold ordinary shares, you will be subject to

 

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