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Amazon to Create 5,000 New, Part-Time, Work-From-Home Jobs over the Next Year

Now in its fifth year, Amazon’s innovative Virtual Customer Service program gives employees the flexibility to provide customer service support to Amazon customers while working from home

Virtual Customer Service jobs are part of Amazon’s plan to hire 30,000 part-time roles in the U.S. over the next year

Part-time employees working 20 hours a week or more receive benefits, including the company’s innovative Career Choice program that pre-pays 95 percent of tuition for courses in high-demand fields, regardless of relevancy to Amazon

SEATTLE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr. 6, 2017-- (NASDAQ:AMZN)—Amazon today announced plans to create more than 5,000 new part-time roles over the next year in Virtual Customer Service, a program in the company’s award-winning customer service organization that offers employees the flexibility to work from home as a customer service agent. In addition to competitive wages, virtually-located employees who work 20 hours per week or more receive benefits, including the company’s innovative Career Choice program that pre-pays 95 percent of tuition for courses related to in-demand fields, regardless of whether those skills are relevant to jobs at Amazon. These new Virtual Customer Service jobs are part of Amazon’s plans to hire more than 30,000 part-time roles over the next year, on top of more than 100,000 full-time, full-benefit jobs the company is creating in the U.S. over the next 18 months. See the experience of a military spouse and Amazonian working in Virtual Customer Service here.

“There are lots of people who want or need a flexible job—whether they’re a military spouse, a college student, or a parent—and we’re happy to empower these talented people no matter where they happen to live,” said Tom Weiland, Amazon Vice President for Worldwide Customer Service. “We’re finding that roles with Virtual Customer Service are particularly attractive to military spouses who want to continue working and parenting, even if their spouse is deployed or the family is relocated, as often happens with military families. Wounded, injured or ill military veterans and others with mobility challenges are also enjoying these opportunities to work from home with Amazon. Both active duty and retired service men and women support our country and we are happy to support them.”

Amazon Virtual Customer Service employee Sabrina Tierce relocated six years ago from central California to Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington State where her husband is stationed as an Army medic. “It’s amazing to have a job that offers me the flexibility to care for my child when needed and even to move around the country if we are relocated,” said Tierce. “My commute is about 15 paces. The worst part of my day is if there’s a Lego on the stairway, because that’s a rough commute to work.”

Amazon currently employs more than 10,000 military veterans, and last year pledged to hire an additional 25,000 veterans and military spouses during the next five years.

“Amazon’s commitment and taking an intentional step around military spouse employment truly shows that they do understand the challenges that the community faces and that they can be a part of the solution,” said Kylee Durant, USO Vice President for Transition Technology and Innovation Programs as well as a military spouse. “To have an innovator like Amazon recognize the need – the deep need – that military spouses have for employment says to me they are a catalyst for greater societal change in this country.”

Part-Time Opportunities in Amazon Customer Fulfillment
In addition to Virtual Customer Service roles, Amazon will create more than 25,000 part-time roles over the next year across its network of sortation and fulfillment centers where employees sort and consolidate customer packages. Amazon has nearly 40,000 part-time employees across the U.S. and has found the roles are especially appealing to students and stay-at-home parents looking to earn money during windows of availability in their schedules.

Part-Time Employment with Benefits
Over 70 percent of part-time employees in Amazon’s Virtual Customer Service and Customer Fulfillment work more than 20 hours per week, which means they receive benefits, including life and disability insurance, dental and vision insurance with premiums paid in full by Amazon, and funding towards medical insurance. These part-time employees can also take advantage of the company’s Career Choice program, an innovative benefit that helps train employees for in-demand jobs at Amazon or elsewhere so that they can take full advantage of the nation’s innovation economy. The program pre-pays 95 percent of tuition for courses related to in-demand fields, regardless of whether the skills are relevant to a future career at Amazon. More than 9,000 employees have participated in Career Choice and more are signing up every day. Amazon has open-sourced the program and is reaching out to companies to help them copy and adopt their own Career Choice programs.

To learn more about working at Amazon, visit http://www.amazondelivers.jobs/.

About Amazon
Amazon is guided by four principles: customer obsession rather than competitor focus, passion for invention, commitment to operational excellence, and long-term thinking. Customer reviews, 1-Click shopping, personalized recommendations, Prime, Fulfillment by Amazon, AWS, Kindle Direct Publishing, Kindle, Fire tablets, Fire TV, Amazon Echo, and Alexa are some of the products and services pioneered by Amazon. For more information, visit www.amazon.com/about and follow @AmazonNews.

Forward Looking Statement
This press release contains forward-looking statements are inherently difficult to predict. Actual results could differ materially for a variety of reasons, including, in addition to the factors discussed above, the amount that Amazon.com invests in new business opportunities and the timing of those investments, the mix of products and services sold to customers, the mix of net sales derived from products as compared with services, the extent to which we owe income taxes, competition, management of growth, potential fluctuations in operating results, international growth and expansion, the outcomes of legal proceedings and claims, fulfillment, sortation, delivery, and data center optimization, risks of inventory management, seasonality, the degree to which the Company enters into, maintains, and develops commercial agreements, acquisitions and strategic transactions, payments risks, and risks of fulfillment throughput and productivity. Other risks and uncertainties include, among others, risks related to new products, services, and technologies, system interruptions, government regulation and taxation, and fraud. In addition, the current global economic climate amplifies many of these risks. More information about factors that potentially could affect Amazon.com’s financial results is included in Amazon.com’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including its most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and subsequent filings.

Source: Amazon

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