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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 08/05/2011
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as of December 31, 2012 or (b) our cumulative draws from Treasury for the calendar quarters in 2010 through 2012.
 
Treasury has waived the quarterly commitment fee under the senior preferred stock purchase agreement for the first, second and third quarters of 2011 due to the continued fragility of the U.S. mortgage market and to Treasury’s belief that imposing the commitment fee would not generate increased compensation for taxpayers. Treasury stated that it will reevaluate the situation during the next calendar quarter to determine whether to set the quarterly commitment fee for the fourth quarter of 2011.
 
Dividends
 
Holders of the senior preferred stock are entitled to receive, when, as and if declared by our Board of Directors, cumulative quarterly cash dividends at the annual rate of 10% per year on the then-current liquidation preference of the senior preferred stock. Treasury is the current holder of our senior preferred stock. As conservator and under our charter, FHFA has authority to declare and approve dividends on the senior preferred stock. If at any time we do not pay cash dividends on the senior preferred stock when they are due, then immediately following the period we did not pay dividends and for all dividend periods thereafter until the dividend period following the date on which we have paid in cash full cumulative dividends (including any unpaid dividends added to the liquidation preference), the dividend rate will be 12% per year. Dividends on the senior preferred stock that are not paid in cash for any dividend period will accrue and be added to the liquidation preference of the senior preferred stock.
 
Our second quarter dividend of $2.3 billion was declared by the conservator and paid by us on June 30, 2011. Upon receipt of additional funds from Treasury in September 2011, which FHFA will request on our behalf, the annualized dividend on the senior preferred stock will be $10.5 billion based on the 10% dividend rate. The level of dividends on the senior preferred stock will increase in future periods if, as we expect, the conservator requests additional funds on our behalf from Treasury under the senior preferred stock purchase agreement.
 
 
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
 
Our maximum potential exposure to credit losses relating to our outstanding and unconsolidated Fannie Mae MBS and other financial guarantees is primarily represented by the unpaid principal balance of the mortgage loans underlying outstanding and unconsolidated Fannie Mae MBS and other financial guarantees of $57.4 billion as of June 30, 2011 and $56.9 billion as of December 31, 2010.
 
Under the temporary credit and liquidity facilities program in which we provide assistance to housing finance agencies (“HFAs”) and in which Treasury has purchased participation interests, our outstanding commitments totaled $3.5 billion as of June 30, 2011 and $3.7 billion as of December 31, 2010. Our total outstanding liquidity commitments to advance funds for securities backed by multifamily housing revenue bonds totaled $17.6 billion as of June 30, 2011 and $17.8 billion as of December 31, 2010. As of both June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, there were no liquidity guarantee advances outstanding. For a description of these programs, see “MD&A—Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements—Treasury Housing Finance Agency Initiative” in our 2010 Form 10-K.
 
 
RISK MANAGEMENT
 
Our business activities expose us to the following three major categories of financial risk: credit risk, market risk (including interest rate and liquidity risk) and operational risk. We seek to manage these risks and mitigate our losses by using an established risk management framework. Our risk management framework is intended to provide the basis for the principles that govern our risk management activities. In addition to these financial risks, there is significant uncertainty regarding the future of our company, including how long we will continue to be in existence, which we discuss in more detail in “Legislative and Regulatory Developments—GSE Reform” and “Risk Factors.” We are also subject to a number of other risks that could


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