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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 08/05/2011
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no longer recognized in accordance with our nonaccrual accounting policy, the Capital Markets group recognizes interest income reimbursements that the group receives, primarily from Single-Family, for the contractual interest due. The interest expense recognized on the Capital Markets group’s statement of operations is limited to our funding debt, which is reported as “Debt of Fannie Mae” in our condensed consolidated balance sheets. Net interest expense also includes a cost of capital charge allocated among the three business segments.
 
The Capital Markets group’s net interest income increased in the second quarter and first half of 2011 compared with the second quarter and first half of 2010, primarily due to a decline in funding costs as we replaced higher cost debt with lower cost debt. This increase in net interest income due to lower funding costs was partially offset by a decline in interest income from our mortgage portfolio. The reduction of our mortgage securities balance and high balance of nonperforming loans, mainly loans modified in a TDR, and our purchases of delinquent loans from MBS trusts, caused the yield on our portfolio and our interest income to decline. The reimbursements of contractual interest due on nonaccrual loans, from the Single-Family business, were a significant portion of the Capital Markets group’s interest income during the second quarter and first half of 2011. However, the increase in these reimbursements was offset by the decline in interest income on our mortgage-related securities because our securities portfolio balance has declined.
 
Additionally, our net interest income and net interest yield were higher than they would have otherwise been in both the second quarter and first half of 2011 and 2010 because our debt funding needs were lower than would otherwise have been required as a result of funds we received from Treasury under the senior preferred stock purchase agreement. Further, dividends paid to Treasury are not recognized in interest expense.
 
We supplement our issuance of debt with interest rate-related derivatives to manage the prepayment and duration risk inherent in our mortgage investments. The effect of these derivatives, in particular the periodic net interest expense accruals on interest rate swaps, is not reflected in Capital Markets’ net interest income but is included in our results as a component of “Fair value gains (losses), net” and is shown in “Table 10: Fair Value Gains (Losses), Net.” If we had included the economic impact of adding the net contractual interest accruals on our interest rate swaps in our Capital Markets’ interest expense, Capital Markets’ net interest income would have decreased by $658 million for the second quarter of 2011 compared with a decrease of $756 million for the second quarter of 2010, and would have decreased $1.3 billion for the first half of 2011 compared with a decrease of $1.6 billion for the first half of 2010.
 
Net Other-Than-Temporary Impairments
 
The net other-than-temporary impairments recognized by the Capital Markets group is generally consistent with the amount reported in our condensed consolidated results of operations. See “Note 5, Investments in Securities” for information on our other-than-temporary impairments by major security type and primary drivers for other-than-temporary impairments recorded in the second quarter and first half of 2011.
 
Fair Value Gains (Losses), Net
 
The derivative gains and losses that are reported for the Capital Markets group are consistent with the derivative gains and losses reported in our condensed consolidated results of operations. We discuss details of these components of fair value gains and losses in “Consolidated Results of Operations—Fair Value Gains (Losses), Net.”
 
The gains from our trading securities in the second quarter of 2011 were primarily driven by an improvement in fair values of CMBS and agency MBS due to a decline in interest rates partially offset by losses on private-label securities due to a widening of credit spreads. The gains on our trading securities in the first half of 2011 were primarily driven by the narrowing of credit spreads on CMBS.
 
The gains from our trading securities in the second quarter and first half of 2010 were primarily driven by a decrease in interest rates and narrowing of credit spreads.


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