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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/06/2011
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because the cash received was used to reduce our debt and the cost of these funds is included in dividends rather than interest expense.
 
We supplement our issuance of debt with interest rate-related derivatives to manage the prepayment and duration risk inherent in our mortgage investments. The effect of these derivatives, in particular the periodic net interest expense accruals on interest rate swaps, is not reflected in Capital Markets’ net interest income but is included in our results as a component of “Fair value gains (losses), net” and is shown in “Table 9: Fair Value Gains (Losses), Net.” If we had included the economic impact of adding the net contractual interest accruals on our interest rate swaps in our Capital Markets’ interest expense, Capital Markets’ net interest income would have decreased by $635 million in the first quarter of 2011 compared with an $835 million decrease in the first quarter of 2010.
 
Net Other-Than-Temporary Impairments
 
The net other-than-temporary impairments recognized by the Capital Markets group is generally consistent with the amount reported in our condensed consolidated results of operations. See “Note 5, Investments in Securities” for information on our other-than-temporary impairments by major security type and primary drivers for other-than-temporary impairments recorded in the first quarter of 2011.
 
Fair Value Gains (Losses), Net
 
The derivative gains and losses that are reported for the Capital Markets group are consistent with the same gains and losses reported in our condensed consolidated results of operations. We discuss details of these components of fair value gains and losses in “Consolidated Results of Operations—Fair Value Gains (Losses), Net.”
 
The gains on our trading securities for the segment during the first quarter of 2011 were attributable to a narrowing of spreads on CMBS, partially offset by losses on agency MBS due to an increase in interest rates during the period.
 
The gains on our trading securities for the segment during the first quarter of 2010 were attributable to a narrowing of spreads on CMBS and decreases in interest rates during the period.
 
The Capital Markets Group’s Mortgage Portfolio
 
The Capital Markets group’s mortgage portfolio consists of mortgage-related securities and mortgage loans that we own. Mortgage-related securities held by Capital Markets include Fannie Mae MBS and non-Fannie Mae mortgage-related securities. The Fannie Mae MBS that we own are maintained as securities on the Capital Markets group’s balance sheets. Mortgage-related assets held by consolidated MBS trusts are not included in the Capital Markets group’s mortgage portfolio.
 
We are restricted by our senior preferred stock purchase agreement with Treasury in the amount of mortgage assets that we may own. Beginning on each December 31 and thereafter, we are required to reduce our mortgage assets to 90% of the maximum allowable amount that we were permitted to own as of December 31 of the immediately preceding calendar year, until the amount of our mortgage assets reaches $250 billion. The maximum allowable amount of mortgage assets we may own was reduced to $810 billion as of December 31, 2010 and will be reduced to $729 billion as of December 31, 2011. As of March 31, 2011, we owned $757.6 billion in mortgage assets, compared with $788.8 billion as of December 31, 2010.
 
Table 18 summarizes our Capital Markets group’s mortgage portfolio activity for the periods indicated.


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