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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/06/2011
Entire Document
 
Table of Contents

 
PART II—OTHER INFORMATION
 
Item 1.   Legal Proceedings
 
The information in this item supplements information regarding certain legal proceedings set forth in “Legal Proceedings” in our 2010 Form 10-K. We also provide information regarding material legal proceedings in “Note 14, Commitments and Contingencies,” which is incorporated herein by reference. In addition to the matters specifically described or incorporated by reference in this item, we are involved in a number of legal and regulatory proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of business that do not have a material impact on our business. Litigation claims and proceedings of all types are subject to many factors that generally cannot be predicted accurately.
 
We record reserves for legal claims when losses associated with the claims become probable and the amounts can reasonably be estimated. The actual costs of resolving legal claims may be substantially higher or lower than the amounts reserved for those claims. For matters where the likelihood or extent of a loss is not probable or cannot be reasonably estimated, we have not recognized in our condensed consolidated financial statements the potential liability that may result from these matters. We presently cannot determine the ultimate resolution of the matters described or incorporated by reference in this item or in our 2010 Form 10-K. We have recorded a reserve for legal claims related to those matters for which we were able to determine a loss was both probable and reasonably estimable. If certain of these matters are determined against us, it could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition, including our net worth.
 
Item 1A.   Risk Factors
 
In addition to the information in this report, you should carefully consider the risks relating to our business that we identify in “Risk Factors” in our 2010 Form 10-K. This section supplements and updates that discussion and, for a complete understanding of the subject, you should read both together. Please also refer to “MD&A—Risk Management” in this report and in our 2010 Form 10-K for more detailed descriptions of the primary risks to our business and how we seek to manage those risks.
 
The risks we face could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and net worth, and could cause our actual results to differ materially from our past results or the results contemplated by forward-looking statements contained in this report. However, these are not the only risks we face. In addition to the risks we discuss below, we face risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial. The risks we face could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and net worth and could cause our actual results to differ materially from our past results or the results contemplated by the forward-looking statements contained in this report.
 
The future of our company is uncertain.
 
There is significant uncertainty regarding the future of our company, including how long we will continue to be in existence, the extent of our role in the market, what form we will have, and what ownership interest, if any, our current common and preferred stockholders will hold in us after the conservatorship is terminated.
 
On February 11, 2011, Treasury and HUD released a report to Congress on ending the conservatorships of the GSEs and reforming America’s housing finance market. The report provides that the Administration will work with FHFA to determine the best way to responsibly reduce Fannie Mae’s and Freddie Mac’s role in the market and ultimately wind down both institutions. The report also addresses three options for a reformed housing finance system. The report does not state whether or how the existing infrastructure or human capital of Fannie Mae may be used in the establishment of such a reformed system. The report emphasizes the


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