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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/06/2011
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In April 2011, we issued an announcement which prohibited servicers from entering into any agreement that modifies the terms of an approved mortgage insurance master policy on loans delivered to us. We also required servicers to disclose any such agreements with mortgage insurers to us. With respect to our mortgage insurance counterparties, changes to the substance of their master policies have required our prior approval since 2005. In October 2010, we required our top mortgage insurers to notify us promptly of any agreement that affects their investigative or rescission rights. In April 2011, we further clarified and amended our mortgage insurer requirements to prohibit any agreement that has the effect of modifying a master policy, including any investigative or rescission rights, absent our approval. By taking these steps, we hope to mitigate the risk of loss for loans that would have resulted in mortgage insurance rescission, and—as a result—a lender repurchase, for loan defects that we may not have otherwise uncovered in our independent review process.
 
Besides evaluating their condition to assess whether we have incurred probable losses in connection with our coverage, we also evaluate these counterparties individually to determine whether or under what conditions they will remain eligible to insure new mortgages sold to us. Except for Triad Guaranty Insurance Corporation, as of May 6, 2011, our private mortgage insurer counterparties remain qualified to conduct business with us.
 
As of March 31, 2011, our allowance for loan losses of $67.6 billion, allowance for accrued interest receivable of $2.9 billion and reserve for guaranty losses of $257 million incorporated an estimated recovery amount of approximately $16.5 billion from mortgage insurance related both to loans that are individually measured for impairment and those that are collectively reserved. This amount is comprised of the contractual recovery of approximately $17.4 billion as of March 31, 2011 and an adjustment of approximately $975 million which reduces the contractual recovery for our assessment of our mortgage insurer counterparties’ inability to fully pay those claims. As of December 31, 2010, our allowance for loan losses of $61.6 billion, allowance for accrued interest receivable of $3.4 billion and reserve for guaranty losses of $323 million incorporated an estimated recovery amount of approximately $16.4 billion from mortgage insurance related both to loans that are individually measured for impairment and those that are collectively reserved. This amount is comprised of the contractual recovery of approximately $17.5 billion as of December 31, 2010 and an adjustment of approximately $1.2 billion, which reduces the contractual recovery for our assessment of our mortgage insurer counterparties’ inability to fully pay those claims.
 
When an insured loan held in our mortgage portfolio subsequently goes into foreclosure, we charge off the loan, eliminating any previously-recorded loss reserves, and record REO and a mortgage insurance receivable for the claim proceeds deemed probable of recovery, as appropriate. However, if a mortgage insurer rescinds insurance coverage, the initial receivable becomes due from the mortgage seller/servicer. We had outstanding receivables of $4.1 billion as of March 31, 2011 and $4.4 billion as of December 31, 2010 related to amounts claimed on insured, defaulted loans that we have not yet received, of which $650 million as of March 31, 2011 and $648 million as of December 31, 2010 was due from our mortgage seller/servicers. We assessed the receivables for collectibility, and they were recorded net of a valuation allowance of $271 million as of March 31, 2011 and $317 million as of December 31, 2010 in “Other assets.” These mortgage insurance receivables are short-term in nature, having a duration of approximately three to six months, and the valuation allowance reduces our claim receivable to the amount that we consider probable of collection. We received proceeds under our primary and pool mortgage insurance policies for single-family loans of $1.6 billion for the first quarter of 2011 and $6.4 billion for the year ended December 31, 2010.
 
Financial Guarantors
 
We were the beneficiary of financial guarantees totaling $8.6 billion as of March 31, 2011 and $8.8 billion as of December 31, 2010 on securities held in our investment portfolio or on securities that have been resecuritized to include a Fannie Mae guaranty and sold to third parties. The securities covered by these guarantees consist primarily of private-label mortgage-related securities and mortgage revenue bonds. We are also the beneficiary of financial guarantees included in securities issued by Freddie Mac, the federal government and its agencies that totaled $23.9 billion as of March 31, 2011 and $25.7 billion as of December 31, 2010.


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