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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/06/2011
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Table of Contents

 
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
 
Summary of Our Financial Performance for the First Quarter of 2011
 
Our financial results for the first quarter of 2011 reflect continued weakness in the housing and mortgage markets, which remain under pressure from high levels of unemployment, underemployment and the prolonged decline in home prices.
 
Comprehensive loss.  Our total comprehensive loss for the first quarter of 2011 was $6.3 billion, consisting of a net loss of $6.5 billion and other comprehensive income of $181 million. In comparison, we recognized a total comprehensive loss of $435 million in the fourth quarter of 2010, consisting of net income of $65 million and other comprehensive loss of $500 million, and a total comprehensive loss of $10.2 billion in the first quarter of 2010, consisting of a net loss of $11.5 billion and other comprehensive income of $1.4 billion.
 
The change from net income in the fourth quarter of 2010 to net loss in the first quarter of 2011 was primarily due to a $6.7 billion increase in credit-related expenses. Credit-related expenses consist of the provision for loan losses, the provision for guaranty losses and foreclosed property expense. Our higher provision for loan losses during the period was primarily driven by an increase in our total loss reserves due to: (1) a decline in home prices and increase in initial charge-off severity during the period, (2) the number of loans that entered a trial modification period during the quarter, (3) a decline in future expected home prices and (4) loans continuing to remain delinquent for an extended period of time. In addition, the fourth quarter of 2010 reflects a $1.2 billion reduction to credit-related expenses resulting from the resolution of outstanding repurchase requests with Bank of America, N.A. and its affiliates.
 
The $5.1 billion decrease in our net loss in the first quarter of 2011 compared with the first quarter of 2010 was due primarily to a $2.2 billion increase in net interest income, driven by lower interest expense on debt; $289 million in net fair value gains in the first quarter of 2011 compared with $1.7 billion in net fair value losses in the first quarter of 2010, primarily due to fair value gains on derivatives and trading securities; and an $842 million decrease in credit-related expenses, due to a decrease in our provision for loan losses. Other comprehensive income in the first quarter of 2010 was primarily driven by a reduction in our unrealized loss due to significantly improved fair value of available-for-sale securities.
 
Net worth.  Our net worth deficit of $8.4 billion as of March 31, 2011 reflects the recognition of our total comprehensive loss of $6.3 billion and our payment to Treasury of $2.2 billion in senior preferred stock dividends during the first quarter of 2011. In May 2011, the Acting Director of FHFA submitted a request to Treasury on our behalf for $8.5 billion to eliminate our net worth deficit.
 
In the first quarter of 2011, we received $2.6 billion in funds from Treasury to eliminate our net worth deficit as of December 31, 2010. Upon receipt of the additional funds requested to eliminate our net worth deficit as of March 31, 2011, the aggregate liquidation preference on the senior preferred stock will be $99.7 billion, which will require an annualized dividend payment of $10.0 billion. This amount exceeds our reported annual net income for each year since our inception. Through March 31, 2011, we have paid an aggregate of $12.4 billion to Treasury in dividends on the senior preferred stock.
 
Total loss reserves.  Our total loss reserves, which reflect our estimate of the probable losses we have incurred in our guaranty book of business, increased to $72.1 billion as of March 31, 2011 from $66.3 billion as of December 31, 2010. Our total loss reserve coverage to total nonperforming loans was 34.66% as of March 31, 2011, compared with 30.85% as of December 31, 2010. The continued stress on a broad segment of borrowers from persistent high levels of unemployment and underemployment and the prolonged decline in home prices have caused our total loss reserves to remain high for the past several quarters. Further, the shift in our nonperforming loan balance from loans in our collective reserve to loans that are individually impaired has caused our coverage ratio to increase.


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