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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 11/02/2018
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Eastern District of Pennsylvania. The complaint asks the court to set aside the net worth sweep dividend provisions of the senior preferred stock purchase agreements.
U.S. Court of Federal Claims. Fannie Mae is a nominal defendant in three actions filed against the United States in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims: Fisher v. United States of America, filed on December 2, 2013; Rafter v. United States of America, filed on August 14, 2014; and Perry Capital LLC v. United States of America, filed on August 15, 2018. Plaintiffs in these cases allege that the net worth sweep dividend provisions of the senior preferred stock that were implemented pursuant to the August 2012 amendment to the senior preferred stock purchase agreement constitute a taking of Fannie Mae’s property without just compensation in violation of the U.S. Constitution. The Fisher plaintiffs are pursuing this claim derivatively on behalf of Fannie Mae, while the Rafter and Perry Capital plaintiffs are pursing the claim both derivatively and directly against the United States. Plaintiffs in Rafter also allege direct and derivative breach of contract claims against the government. The Perry Capital plaintiffs allege similar breach of contract claims, as well as breach of fiduciary duty claims against the government. Plaintiffs in Fisher request just compensation to Fannie Mae in an unspecified amount. Plaintiffs in Rafter and Perry Capital seek just compensation for themselves on their direct claims and payment of damages to Fannie Mae on their derivative claims. The United States filed a motion to dismiss the Fisher and Rafter cases on August 1, 2018.
District of Delaware. Fannie Mae is a nominal defendant in Jacobs v. FHFA, filed on August 17, 2015 against FHFA and Treasury in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware. Plaintiffs allege that the net worth sweep dividend provisions of the senior preferred stock that were implemented pursuant to the August 2012 amendments to the agreements violate Delaware law. Plaintiffs are pursuing this claim derivatively on behalf of Fannie Mae and directly against the government. The court dismissed the case on November 27, 2017, and plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit on December 22, 2017.
Item 1A.  Risk Factors
In addition to the information in this report, you should carefully consider the risks relating to our business that we identify in “Risk Factors” in our 2017 Form 10-K. This section supplements and updates that discussion. Please also refer to “MD&A—Risk Management” in this report and in our 2017 Form 10-K for more detailed descriptions of the primary risks to our business and how we seek to manage those risks.
The risks we face could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and net worth, and could cause our actual results to differ materially from our past results or the results contemplated by forward-looking statements contained in this report. However, these are not the only risks we face. In addition to the risks we discuss below and in our 2017 Form 10-K, we face risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial.
The Single Security Initiative may adversely affect our financial results and contribute to declines in the liquidity or market value of our MBS. The Single Security Initiative also increases our counterparty credit risk and operational risk.
In 2014, FHFA directed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to develop a single common mortgage-backed security that is fungible with then-outstanding Fannie Mae guaranteed mortgage pass-through certificates and Freddie Mac Participation Certificates (“Freddie Mac PCs”). The security to be developed will be known as a Uniform Mortgage-Backed Security or UMBS. The FHFA initiative to develop a UMBS (the “Single Security Initiative”) is intended to maximize liquidity for both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgage-backed securities in the “to-be-announced” or TBA market. In March 2018, FHFA announced that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will start issuing UMBS in place of their current offerings of TBA-eligible mortgage-backed securities on June 3, 2019. The new UMBS will be issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac through their joint venture, Common Securitization Solutions, LLC (“CSS”), using the Common Securitization Platform (“CSP”).
Historically, Fannie Mae MBS have had a trading advantage over comparable Freddie Mac PCs. One of FHFA’s stated objectives for the Single Security Initiative is to reduce the costs to Freddie Mac and taxpayers that result from differences in liquidity of Fannie Mae MBS and Freddie Mac PCs. As the implementation date of the Single Security Initiative approaches, some Fannie Mae MBS and comparable Freddie Mac PCs are trading closer to or at parity. If this trend continues, it could adversely affect our financial results.
It is also possible that uncertainty surrounding the implementation and overall impact of the Single Security Initiative could contribute to declines in the liquidity or market value of our Fannie Mae MBS. The industry has expressed concerns that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac UMBS may not be truly fungible. If investors do not accept

Fannie Mae Third Quarter 2018 Form 10-Q
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