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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/07/2015
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under a hypothetical future stress scenario. The new standards also set forth enhanced operational performance expectations and define remedial actions that may be imposed should an approved mortgage insurer fail to comply with the revised requirements. In addition, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac established a framework and timelines for existing approved mortgage insurers to come into compliance with the new standards while they continue to insure new business eligible for delivery to us.
Although the financial condition of our primary mortgage insurer counterparties currently approved to write new business has improved in recent years, there is still risk that these counterparties may fail to fulfill their obligations to pay our claims under insurance policies. In addition, as shown in “Table 35: Mortgage Insurance Coverage,” three of our top mortgage insurer counterparties—PMI, RMIC and Triad—are currently under various forms of supervised control by their state regulators and are in run-off, which increases the risk that these counterparties will pay claims only in part or fail to pay claims at all under existing insurance policies.
When we estimate the credit losses that are inherent in our mortgage loans and under the terms of our guaranty obligations we also consider the recoveries that we will receive on primary mortgage insurance, as mortgage insurance recoveries would reduce the severity of the loss associated with defaulted loans. We evaluate the financial condition of our mortgage insurer counterparties and adjust the contractually due recovery amounts to ensure that only probable losses as of the balance sheet date are included in our loss reserve estimate. As a result, if our assessment of one or more of our mortgage insurer counterparties’ ability to fulfill their respective obligations to us worsens, it could result in an increase in our loss reserves. The amount by which our estimated benefit from mortgage insurance reduced our total loss reserves was $2.9 billion as of March 31, 2015 and $4.1 billion as of December 31, 2014.
When an insured loan held in our retained mortgage portfolio subsequently goes into foreclosure, we charge off the loan, eliminating any previously-recorded loss reserves, and record REO and a mortgage insurance receivable for the claim proceeds deemed probable of recovery, as appropriate. However, if a mortgage insurer rescinds, cancels or denies insurance coverage, the initial receivable becomes due from the mortgage seller or servicer. We had outstanding receivables of $1.5 billion recorded in “Other assets” in our condensed consolidated balance sheets as of March 31, 2015 and $1.4 billion as of December 31, 2014 related to amounts claimed on insured, defaulted loans excluding government insured loans. Of this amount, $360 million as of March 31, 2015 and $269 million as of December 31, 2014 was due from our mortgage sellers or servicers. We assessed the total outstanding receivables for collectibility, and they are recorded net of a valuation allowance of $870 million as of March 31, 2015 and $799 million as of December 31, 2014. The valuation allowance reduces our claim receivable to the amount which is considered probable of collection as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014.
Financial Guarantors
We are the beneficiary of non-governmental financial guarantees on non-agency securities held in our retained mortgage portfolio and on non-agency securities that have been resecuritized to include a Fannie Mae guaranty and sold to third parties. The total unpaid principal balance of guaranteed non-agency securities in our retained mortgage portfolio was $4.1 billion as of March 31, 2015 and $4.6 billion as of December 31, 2014. See “Note 16, Concentrations of Credit Risk—Financial Guarantors” in our 2014 Form 10-K for a further discussion of our exposure to financial guarantors.
We are also the beneficiary of financial guarantees included in securities issued by Freddie Mac, the federal government and its agencies that totaled $19.0 billion as of March 31, 2015 and $19.2 billion as of December 31, 2014.
Reinsurers
See “MD&A—Risk Management—Credit Risk Management—Institutional Counterparty Credit Risk Management—Credit Guarantors—Reinsurers” in our 2014 Form 10-K for information about reinsurers.
Lenders with Risk Sharing
We enter into risk sharing agreements with lenders pursuant to which the lenders agree to bear all or some portion of the credit losses on the covered loans. Our maximum potential loss recovery from lenders under these risk sharing agreements on single-family loans was $8.5 billion as of March 31, 2015, compared with $8.9 billion as of December 31, 2014. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, 47% of our maximum potential loss recovery on single-family loans was from three lenders. Our maximum potential loss recovery from lenders under risk sharing agreements on DUS and non-DUS multifamily loans was $42.9 billion as of March 31, 2015, compared with $41.7 billion as of December 31, 2014. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, 32% of our maximum potential loss recovery on multifamily loans was from three DUS lenders.
The percentage of single-family recourse obligations from lenders with investment grade credit ratings (based on the lower of S&P, Moody’s and Fitch ratings) was 48% as of March 31, 2015, compared with 49% as of December 31, 2014. The

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