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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/07/2015
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addition, the rapid expansion of these servicers’ servicing portfolios results in increased operational risk, which could negatively impact their ability to effectively manage their servicing portfolios. In addition, regulatory bodies have been reviewing the activities of some of our largest non-depository servicers. See “Risk Factors” in our 2014 Form 10-K for a discussion of the risk of our reliance on servicers.
Some of our loans are serviced by subsidiaries and/or affiliates of Ocwen Financial Corporation (“Ocwen”). Ocwen has been the subject of regulatory scrutiny and actions, as well as rating agency downgrades. We are working with Ocwen on the orderly transfer of a substantial portion of the servicing of our loans. As of March 31, 2015, approximately 3% of our total single-family guaranty book of business was serviced by Ocwen.
Our five largest single-family mortgage sellers, including their affiliates, accounted for approximately 32% of our single-family business acquisition volume in the first quarter of 2015, compared with approximately 37% in the first quarter of 2014. Our largest mortgage seller is Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., which, together with its affiliates, accounted for approximately 13% of our single-family business acquisition volume in the first quarter of 2015 and 2014. A number of our largest single-family mortgage seller counterparties have reduced or eliminated their purchases of mortgage loans from mortgage brokers and correspondent lenders in recent years, resulting in a decline in our single-family mortgage seller concentration. As a result, we are acquiring a greater portion of our business volume directly from non-depository and smaller depository financial institutions that may not have the same financial strength or operational capacity as our largest mortgage seller counterparties. We could be required to absorb losses on defaulted loans that a failed mortgage seller is obligated to repurchase from us if we determine there was an underwriting eligibility breach. See “Risk Factors” in our 2014 Form 10-K for a discussion of the risks to our business due to changes in the mortgage industry.
If we determine that a mortgage loan did not meet our underwriting or eligibility requirements, loan representations or warranties were violated or a mortgage insurer rescinded coverage, then our mortgage sellers and/or servicers are obligated to either repurchase the loan or foreclosed property, reimburse us for our losses or provide other remedies unless the loan has become eligible for relief under our new representation and warranty framework. We refer to our demands that mortgage sellers and servicers meet these obligations collectively as repurchase requests. See “MD&A—Risk Management—Credit Risk Management—Institutional Counterparty Credit Risk Management—Mortgage Sellers and Servicers” in our 2014 Form 10-K for a discussion of our mortgage sellers and servicers’ repurchase obligations.
Mortgage sellers and servicers may not meet the terms of their repurchase obligations, and we may be unable to recover on all outstanding loan repurchase obligations resulting from their breaches of contractual obligations. Failure by a significant mortgage seller or servicer, or a number of mortgage sellers or servicers, to fulfill repurchase obligations to us could result in an increase in our credit losses and credit-related expense, and have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, actions we take to pursue our contractual remedies could increase our costs, reduce our revenues, or otherwise have an adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, in estimating our allowance for loan losses, we assumed no benefit from repurchase demands due to us from mortgage sellers or servicers that, in our view, lacked the financial capacity to honor their contractual obligations. The unpaid principal balance of our outstanding repurchase requests was $1.3 billion as of March 31, 2015, compared with $1.0 billion as of December 31, 2014. See “MD&A—Risk Management—Credit Risk Management—Single-Family Mortgage Credit Risk Management—Single-Family Acquisition and Servicing Policies and Underwriting and Servicing Standards” in our 2014 Form 10-K for a discussion of our repurchase requests.
Credit Guarantors
We use various types of credit guarantors to manage our single-family mortgage credit risk, including mortgage insurers, financial guarantors, reinsurers and lenders with risk sharing.
Mortgage Insurers
We are generally required, pursuant to our charter, to obtain credit enhancements on single-family conventional mortgage loans that we purchase or securitize with LTV ratios over 80% at the time of purchase. We use several types of credit enhancements to manage our single-family mortgage credit risk, including primary and pool mortgage insurance coverage. Table 35 displays our risk in force for mortgage insurance coverage on single-family loans in our guaranty book of business and our insurance in force for our mortgage insurer counterparties. The table includes our top ten mortgage insurer counterparties, which provided over 99% of our total mortgage insurance coverage on single-family loans in our guaranty book of business as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014. In addition, for our mortgage insurer counterparties not approved to write new business, we have provided the percentage of their claims payments that the counterparties are currently deferring based on the direction of their state regulators, referred to as their deferred payment obligation. Both our risk in force and our insurance in force increased in 2014 primarily due to the increase in our acquisition of loans with LTV

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