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SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/07/2015
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During the first quarter of 2015, the multifamily sector continued to exhibit stable fundamentals, according to preliminary third-party data, with flat vacancy levels and positive rent growth. The national multifamily vacancy rate for institutional investment-type apartment properties was an estimated 5.0% as of March 31, 2015, the same rate as of both December 31, 2014 and March 31, 2014.
National asking rents increased by an estimated 0.5% during both the first quarter of 2015 and the fourth quarter of 2014. Continued demand for multifamily rental units was reflected in the estimated positive net absorption (that is, the net change in the number of occupied rental units during the time period) of approximately 37,000 units during the first quarter of 2015, according to preliminary data from Reis, Inc., compared with approximately 41,000 units during the fourth quarter of 2014.
As a result of the continued demand for multifamily rental units over the past few years, there has been an increase in the amount of new multifamily construction development nationally. Approximately 340,000 new multifamily units are expected to be completed this year. The bulk of this new supply is concentrated in a limited number of metropolitan areas. We believe this increase in supply will result in a temporary slowdown in net absorption rates, occupancy levels and effective rents in those areas throughout 2015. In addition, because estimated multifamily rent growth has outpaced wage growth over the past few years, ongoing multifamily rental housing affordability remains a concern. Nevertheless, we expect overall national rental market supply and demand to remain in balance over the longer term, based on expected construction completions, expected obsolescence, positive rental household formation trends and expected increases in the population of 20- to 34-year olds, which is the primary age group that tends to rent multifamily housing.
Outlook
Uncertainty Regarding our Future Status. We expect continued significant uncertainty regarding the future of our company and the housing finance system, including how long the company will continue to be in its current form, the extent of our role in the market, what form we will have, what ownership interest, if any, our current common and preferred stockholders will hold in us after the conservatorship is terminated and whether we will continue to exist following conservatorship.
We cannot predict the prospects for the enactment, timing or final content of housing finance reform legislation. See “Business—Housing Finance Reform” in our 2014 Form 10-K, for a discussion of proposals for reform of the housing finance system, including the GSEs, that could materially affect our business, including proposals to wind down Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. See “Risk Factors” in both this report and in our 2014 Form 10-K for a discussion of the risks to our business relating to the uncertain future of our company.
Financial Results. Our financial results continued to be strong in the first quarter of 2015, with net income of $1.9 billion. We expect to remain profitable on an annual basis for the foreseeable future; however, we expect our earnings in 2015 and future years will be substantially lower than our earnings for 2014, primarily due to our expectation of substantially lower income from resolution agreements, continued declines in net interest income from our retained mortgage portfolio assets and lower credit-related income. In addition, certain factors, such as changes in interest rates or home prices, could result in significant volatility in our financial results from quarter to quarter or year to year. Our future financial results also will be affected by a number of other factors, including: our guaranty fee rates; the volume of single-family mortgage originations in the future; the size, composition and quality of our retained mortgage portfolio and guaranty book of business; and economic and housing market conditions. Our expectations for our future financial results do not take into account the impact on our business of potential future legislative or regulatory changes, which could have a material impact on our financial results, particularly the enactment of housing finance reform legislation as noted in “Uncertainty Regarding our Future Status” above.
Under the terms of the senior preferred stock, our capital reserve will decline by $600 million each year until it reaches zero in 2018. Although we expect to remain profitable on an annual basis for the foreseeable future, due to our declining capital reserve, our expectation of substantially lower earnings in future years than our earnings for 2014, and the potential for significant volatility in our financial results, we could experience a net worth deficit in a future quarter, particularly as our capital reserve approaches zero. If that were to occur, we would be required to draw additional funds from Treasury under the senior preferred stock purchase agreement in order to avoid being placed into receivership. See “Risk Factors” in our 2014 Form 10-K for a discussion of the risks associated with our declining capital reserves.
Revenues. We currently have two primary sources of revenues: (1) the guaranty fees we receive for managing the credit risk on loans underlying Fannie Mae MBS held by third parties; and (2) the difference between interest income earned on the assets in our retained mortgage portfolio and the interest expense associated with the debt that funds those assets. Our “retained mortgage portfolio” refers to the mortgage-related assets we own (which excludes the portion of assets held by consolidated MBS trusts that back mortgage-related securities owned by third parties). In recent years, an increasing portion of our net interest income has been derived from guaranty fees rather than from our retained mortgage portfolio assets, due to the impact of guaranty fee increases and the shrinking of our retained mortgage portfolio. We estimate that a majority of our

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