Print Page  |  Close Window

SEC Filings

10-Q
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION FANNIE MAE filed this Form 10-Q on 05/07/2015
Entire Document
 





FANNIE MAE
(In conservatorship)
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - (Continued)
(UNAUDITED)


2014. Our primary mortgage insurance coverage risk in force was $109.8 billion and $108.7 billion as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively. Our pool mortgage insurance coverage risk in force was $806 million and $852 million as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively. Our top four mortgage insurance companies provided 79% of our mortgage insurance as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014.
Of our largest primary mortgage insurers, PMI Mortgage Insurance Co. (“PMI”), Triad Guaranty Insurance Corporation (“Triad”) and Republic Mortgage Insurance Company (“RMIC”) are under various forms of supervised control by their state regulators and are in run-off. Entering run-off may close off a source of profits and liquidity that may have otherwise assisted a mortgage insurer in paying claims under insurance policies, and could also cause the quality and speed of its claims processing to deteriorate. These three mortgage insurers provided a combined $11.7 billion, or 11%, of our risk in force mortgage insurance coverage of our single-family guaranty book of business as of March 31, 2015.
Effective April 10, 2015, PMI increased its cash payments on policyholder claims from 67% to 70%, and subsequently paid sufficient amounts of its outstanding deferred payment obligations to bring payment on those claims to 70%. It is uncertain whether PMI will be permitted in the future to pay any remaining deferred policyholder claims or increase or decrease the amount of cash they pay on claims.
Although the financial condition of our mortgage insurer counterparties currently approved to write new business has improved in recent years, there is still risk that these counterparties may fail to fulfill their obligations to pay our claims under insurance policies. If we determine that it is probable that we will not collect all of our claims from one or more of our mortgage insurer counterparties, it could result in an increase in our loss reserves, which could adversely affect our results of operations, liquidity, financial condition and net worth.
When we estimate the credit losses that are inherent in our mortgage loans and under the terms of our guaranty obligations we also consider the recoveries that we will receive on primary mortgage insurance, as mortgage insurance recoveries would reduce the severity of the loss associated with defaulted loans. We evaluate the financial condition of our mortgage insurer counterparties and adjust the contractually due recovery amounts to ensure that only probable losses as of the balance sheet date are included in our loss reserve estimate. As a result, if our assessment of one or more of our mortgage insurer counterparties’ ability to fulfill their respective obligations to us worsens, it could result in an increase in our loss reserves. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, the amount by which our estimated benefit from mortgage insurance reduced our total loss reserves as of these dates was $2.9 billion and $4.1 billion, respectively.
We had outstanding receivables of $1.5 billion recorded in “Other assets” in our condensed consolidated balance sheets as of March 31, 2015 and $1.4 billion as of December 31, 2014 related to amounts claimed on insured, defaulted loans excluding government insured loans. Of this amount, $360 million as of March 31, 2015 and $269 million as of December 31, 2014 was due from our mortgage sellers or servicers. We assessed the total outstanding receivables for collectibility, and they are recorded net of a valuation allowance of $870 million as of March 31, 2015 and $799 million as of December 31, 2014. The valuation allowance reduces our claim receivable to the amount which is considered probable of collection as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014.
For information on credit risk associated with our derivative transactions and repurchase agreements refer to “Note 9, Derivative Instruments” and “Note 14, Netting Arrangements.”

105